Planning Your Move

Moving to a new country can be challenging. We have put together a short checklist of things you should begin getting sorted out once you decide to accept a position at OsloMet.

Securing a Residence Permit 

Once you have accepted a position at OsloMet, you should apply for a visa and a work permit as soon as possible.

Finding a Place to Live

Housing is relatively expensive in Oslo and the surrounding area compared to other cities in Europe. At the same time, the cost of rent is lower than you might expect, particularly when you take into account what you will be earning in Norway.  

The standard of housing is by and large very high, and landlords tend to keep the apartments they rent out in good condition. The tenant-landlord relationship, moreover, is regulated by law as a way of protecting tenants’ rights (nyinorge.no ).

Below is a list of resources we recommend you make us of as you look for a place to live. We encourage you to contact us as soon as you know you will be taking up a position at OsloMet. If you send us a short description of your housing needs, we will do our best to assist you.  

Long-Term Housing in Oslo

Short-Term Housing in Oslo

Securing an Identification Number 

Everyone living in Norway has an unique identification number (skatteetaten.no). You will use this number when interacting with government agencies and will need one to open a Norwegian bank account. You can apply for an identification number at the Service Centre for Foreign Workers located in central Oslo (sua.no).  

Proof of Identity 

Norwegians use either their bank card or their driver’s license as identification in situations where they need to show ID.  

European citizens living and working in Norway can use their European driver’s license as identification.  

The most reliable form of identification for citizens of non-European countries is a passport. You may also be able to use your bank card as a form of ID, as long as it includes your identification number and a picture. Your residence permit, issued as a card, does not constitute an official form of identification.  

Further Reading