Norwegian version

Promoting and inhibiting factors for education and employment among young adults receiving welfare benefits or health services due to persistent pain and psychological distress

Persistent pain and psychological distress in young adults can negatively impact participation in education and employment, leading to significant consequences for individuals and society.

In collaboration with various user groups, this PhD project will contribute to develop more comprehensive knowledge on promoting and inhibiting factors for participation in education and employment among young adults with persistent pain and psychological distress.

The project will follow the principles of Needs-led research in the Bridge-Building Initiative and involve young adults with persistent pain and psychological distress, healthcare professionals, and the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV).

These users and stakeholders will participate in planning, conducting and implementing the project.

This method is intended to enhance the practical value of the research.

The project is part of the Bridge-Building Initiative at the Faculty of Health Sciences.

  • Participants

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  • More about the project

    In the project, the following research questions will be examined:

    • What evidence is available regarding barriers and facilitators to education and employment for young adults with co-occurring pain and psychological distress?
    • How do young adults with persistent pain and psychological distress experience follow up from the health and welfare services, and what do they perceive as barriers and facilitators for education or employment?
    • How do trajectories of participation in education and employment unfold among young adults with persistent pain and psychological distress receiving welfare benefits and health services?

    The planning and design of the project are based on the Bridge Builder Model for needs-led research.

    Furthermore, the project will employ various methodological approaches to answer the research questions in three sub-studies. This form of bridging will facilitate two-way knowledge transfer between academic research and societal needs